Understanding Dates

Untitled Document Before entering in this complex world of dates and hours in Excel we need to understand some basic aspects of as Excel manipulates dates and hours. For many, dates and hours are categorized as Excel Advanced. Dates and hours many times can become confused and errors are committed when they could be prevented. Other times we complicate simple solutions with a complex formula. It sees the example: The question was of as to transform a date into day of the week. My reply it was: =TEXTO (DIA.DA.SE FLOWS (D1); ' ' dddd' ') A simpler solution would be to format the cell for ' ' dddd' '. Both the methods are correct, but most efficient it is as. Obviously that the first solution introduces two new functions that can be used to solve other problems, but the complexity was unnecessary.

Excel is a super matrix that if benefits of the capacity of mathematical processing of the current microcomputers to execute tasks that in the past alone were possible with mathematical co-processors. As Excel it deals with numbers is of if waiting that the dates and hours also are worked in this format. In other words, when you see a date (or hour) in Excel, in the truth, that date (or hour) if relates to a whole number or a fraction. A problem that generally badly is understood by the users of Excel is when we have hours that they exceed the 24 hours of the day. We go to assume that you worked 25 hours in one month and for each worked hour you gain R$10. It is easy to see how much you earned in the month; however, the day has only 24 hours and this not dumb. Therefore if you worked 25 hours, for Excel you you worked 24 hours (one day complete, that is, 24/24) plus one hour (1/24) that it is a fraction of the day.